The Cost of Discipleship Is High

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The text for our message is our Gospel, Luke 14:25-35.
Grace and peace to you from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ! 
Jesus is at the height of His success as we measure it.  People are flocking to Him—the numbers growing as He gets closer to Jerusalem.  Yet, Jesus has to ruin it by telling the people a bunch of hard truths they can’t handle.  He can’t help it.  Jesus never compromises the truth, for that would be compromising Himself. 
The Lord’s criteria for discipleship are as simple as they sound horrifying: “If anyone comes to Me and does not hate his father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters, yes, and even his own life, he cannot be My disciple.”  You can almost hear the church growth gurus gasp.  “That’s not the way to win a following.  You have to give the people something they want and like.  Jesus, we know following You involves sacrifice, but if you can, please keep those demands to a minimum.  Otherwise, they’ll go and listen to some other preacher.”
But that’s not Jesus.  He doesn’t want anyone to be His disciple who hasn’t “counted the cost,” for such will not be disciples for long.  The cost of discipleship is high!  Remember Jesus is on His way to Jerusalem.  He knows what awaits Him there.  He knows that this crowd will reach its peak on Palm Sunday as He rides in triumphantly into the city.  He knows that as the week wears on, the crowds will dwindle.  By Friday, they will not cry “Hosanna!” but “Crucify Him!”  He knows, in the end, He will be alone.  His many followers will abandon Him. 
Jesus knows all that, and so sets forth the conditions for following Him.  First, there must be a willingness to leave family ties.  The word “hate” sounds harsh to our ears.  Jesus means to shock you, to make you realize that nothing dare come before Him in your life as a disciple.       
No, Jesus Christ—Love Incarnate—isn’t commanding you to “hate” as we use and understand the word in English today.  He’s not commanding you to store up bitterness or rage against others.  For Jesus, “hate” is not so much a feeling, but a choice of the will.  To “love” one thing and to “hate” another gives preference to the former.  Jesus is not calling for you to despise your family members; He is calling upon you to love Him more than them.  He is telling you to keep the First Commandment: “You shall have no other gods.”   That’s what Jesus means!
But before you breathe a sigh of relief and say, “Oh!  That’s all He meant!” you must realize that even this level of commitment is far beyond you.  Quite naturally, you place family above the Lord.  Stalwart supporters of sound doctrine may find fault with a pastor or congregation when that doctrine is applied to their own wayward children.  Spouses and children give in to the temptation to skip worship at the request of an unbelieving family member.  And who is courageous enough to correct a false teaching when the family is gathered around the table for Christmas dinner?  Nobody.  You believe that keeping the peace is more important.   The cost of discipleship is high, way more than you are willing to pay. 
And just so you understand this clearly, Jesus gives it a second go-around: “Whoever does not bear his own cross and come after Me cannot be My disciple.”  
What’s Jesus doing?  Not only does He not understand all the latest marketing techniques, He seems to have some crazy death wish.  Crucifixion is a cruel and agonizing way to die, a form punishment reserved for the vilest offenders and sub-human slaves.  For the Jews, it was the death of the damned.  But here, it looks like Jesus is telling you that we have to embrace this terrifying, shame-filled way of dying, this cross and its curse, in order to be His disciple. 
That’s right!  That’s exactly what’s He’s saying.  If you don’t bear your own cross, you’re incapable of being His disciple.  Following Jesus means self-denial.  It means the sacrifice of your own will for the sake of Christ. 
“Cross” here, does not refer to the troubles that commonly come in life to all people.  Rather, for a believer, “bearing a cross” means to accept whatever suffering might result from a sincere commitment to Christ and His kingdom.  Sometimes it means standing toe-to-toe with those who are speaking lies or teaching falsely.  Sometimes it means not speaking up for yourself when you are personally attacked, but rather taking the blows for the sake of the greater good of the Church.  For many of the disciples present on that day Jesus spoke these words, bearing the cross was more than just a figurative expression.  Their confession of Christ meant their own martyr’s death.  But even if it does not mean literal death for you, the cost of disciples is too high.  It is way more than you can pay.  And you better realize that before you begin.
Jesus tells two parables to emphasize this point.  The first involves counting the costs of constructing a tower.  If you were to launch a major building project, wouldn’t you first sit down to find out how much money you need and how much you have before you begin?  Otherwise, you may be mocked for starting something you couldn’t finish.  Think also of a king.  He’s planning for war, but then finds out he’s outnumbered two-to-one.  Since he knows he will face certain defeat, wouldn’t his best course be to seek terms of peace before he engages in battle? 
Count the cost.  You simply can’t afford what it costs to be Jesus’ disciple.  You don’t have the necessary level of commitment.  You don’t have enough to defeat your enemy.  You simply can’t do it.  No one can meet such impossible demands.  The cost of discipleship is too high. 
So what are you to do?  Do you throw in the towel, give up, and say, “Why even bother?”  Are you like the rich young ruler who wanted to be a disciple?  When he heard what Jesus told him to do—to sell all his possessions and give them to the poor—he simply gave up his desire to be a disciple.  Jesus says: “Any one of you who does not renounce all that he has cannot be My disciple.” 
This news should leave you disturbed, troubled, anxious.  But before we go on for relief, let me point out two things.  First, this text well illustrates why I waste no time telling you that you are saved by your commitment to Jesus or by how much you love Him or how hard you are trying—because no one can do it.  No one can achieve the level of commitment to hate his family, hate himself, prepare to die, and renounce all things.
Second, and far more importantly, I must point out that I have only spoken in terms of the Law so far.  Remember, the purpose of God’s Law: It tells you what God demands of you if you are to be perfectly holy and righteous before Him.  It is also to show you that you cannot do it.  When Jesus says this, He is preaching the Law.  He is declaring to all who hear that the cost of discipleship is extraordinary, and it is one that you in your sinfulness are incapable of paying. 
Being Jesus’ disciple is impossible!  Believe it; get used to it.  You don’t have enough “hate” for the things of this world to love God enough.  You certainly don’t have the commitment to bear the cross for your own sins.  You don’t have the money, the ability, or the strength to build a stairway to heaven.  That’s what Jesus wants you to learn today.  The cost of discipleship is just too high!
I said earlier no one can meet such impossible demands; but that’s not completely true.  There is one exception!  The God-man, Jesus Christ.  Jesus loved His heavenly Father more than His family and His own life.  We read in the Gospels that Jesus’ mother and brothers came to see Him to plead with Him to stop teaching, maybe even to haul Him away.  Rather than give in for the sake of family peace, Jesus continued to do the Father’s will that He might go to the cross for us. 
Jesus put His heavenly Father’s will over His own.  We hear His prayer in Gethsemane: “Father, if it is Your will, take this cup away from Me; nevertheless not My will, but Yours, be done.”  Though He did not wish to suffer, Jesus gave up His own life to complete His Father’s plan for your salvation. 
Jesus kept the Law for you and He gives you the credit for His obedience.  By His grace, He covers you with His righteousness.  Therefore, the Father looks upon you and does not see your sin; He sees Christ’s perfect obedience.  Jesus does not demand that you die for your sin, because He has already died for it.  Instead, He calls you to confess your sin, to acknowledge that His death is the one you deserve.  And then He declares that He shares His death with you.  He joins you into His death so that you do not have to die for your sin yourself. 
What you cannot do, Jesus does for you.  From the cross, He builds His Church.  You can’t do it.  I can’t do it.  No one can pay what it costs, except Jesus.  Only He frees you, a lost and condemned creature.  Only He has purchased and won you from all sins, from death, and from the power of the devil, not with silver or gold, but with His holy precious blood and His innocent suffering and death.
For you, it’s impossible.  The cost of discipleship is too high, way more than you can pay.  You just can’t do it by your own reason and strength.  But the Holy Spirit has called you through the Gospel, enlightened you with His gifts, and sanctified, and kept you in the true faith.  He does what is impossible—to make you His disciple, to make you God’s own dear child. 
And surprisingly, you will find that you have taken up your cross and followed Jesus.  How did this happen?  The Apostle Paul says in Romans 6: “Do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into His death?  We were, therefore, buried with Him by baptism into death, that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we too may begin to live a new life.  If we have been united with Him like this in His death, we will also be united with Him in His resurrection.” 
In baptism, you were crucified into the death of Christ and raised to life in His resurrection.  You have eternal life.  And you have the promise that though you die, the Lord will raise the bodies of you and all believers on the Last Day. 
The baptismal life is one of dying and rising.  The Old Adam must be put to death daily.  The Old Adam in you should by daily contrition and repentance be drowned and die with all sins and evil desires, that a new man should daily emerge and arise to live before God in righteousness and purity forever. 
That makes bearing your cross an entirely different matter.  To bear your cross is to bear Christ’s cross, and it is not nearly as heavy as when He carried it to Calvary.  In fact, your burden is as light as a feather.  You bear His cross when it is traced upon you in Baptism.  This is the cross that you might outwardly sketch upon yourself as you hear the Invocation and receive the Absolution on Sunday morning—you will feel no greater a weight or pain of Christ’s cross than that, for He has suffered all the weight and all the pain. 
Rather than demanding your body and blood as a sacrifice for your sin, Jesus gives you His body and blood into death for the forgiveness of your sins.  In His Supper, He now gives you His risen body and blood for the forgiveness of your sins.  That is what it means to bear your cross—it means to be forgiven, for in forgiveness Jesus shares His cross with you, taking away your death and giving you His resurrection.
Therefore, set aside all pretenses of your commitment to Christ, for the Lord exposes how weak and unsatisfactory that commitment is.  Instead, boast in the Lord.  Confess your sins—including your pride in your dedication to Him, and trust solely in His grace and mercy.  Give thanks that He has made you His disciple by His commitment, by His sacrifice, His once-for all ultimate sacrifice.
This is the Good News we proclaim to the world: Yes, the cost of discipleship is high, but it has been paid by Christ, your Lord and Savior.  And you are forgiven for all of your sins in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

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